Advancing Reconciliation in Canada: A Guide for Investors

This guide helps investment organizations across Canada to think about the role that they can play to advance reconciliation. By providing tangible steps and case studies, our goal is to impart readers with inspiration about the opportunities that exist to not only talk about reconciliation; but to practice reconciliation.

Webinar: Voting Your Proxies with Purpose

Proxy voting is a critical means by which you can influence the behaviour and governance of Canadian corporations, yet many investors – including Indigenous trusts – delegate proxy voting to their investment managers, often with minimal oversight. This webinar covers why your voting rights matter, and how to monitor and manage your proxies to ensure your votes are being cast in your best interest.

Responsible Investment and Indigenous Trusts: a Discussion Paper

The purpose of this discussion paper is to start a conversation among Indigenous communities and their representatives about the opportunities and challenges associated with aligning Trust investments with community values, community development aspirations and the broader goals of Reconciliation.

NATOA Indigenous Trust Training Program 

Funded by TD Bank Financial Group and AANDC, the National Indigenous Trustee Training Program is designed to empower participants to make informed decisions on behalf of their communities now and in the future.

 

The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

The Circle is a member based network to promote giving, sharing, and philanthropy in Aboriginal communities across the country. They connect with and support the empowerment of First Nations, Inuit and Métis nations, communities, and individuals in building a stronger, healthier future.

Advancing Reconciliation in Canada: A Guide for Investors

This guide helps investment organizations across Canada to think about the role that they can play to advance reconciliation. By providing tangible steps and case studies, our goal is to impart readers with inspiration about the opportunities that exist to not only talk about reconciliation; but to practice reconciliation.

Moving Capital, Shifting Power

Achieving a strong, inclusive economy in Canada requires intentional efforts to ensure that historically marginalized groups, including Indigenous peoples, have opportunities to succeed and grow as employees, as business owners, as entrepreneurs and as leaders.
This report identifies opportunities for investors and investment organizations to contribute to economic reconciliation by enhancing demand for Indigenous employment, advancement, and contracting.

Business and Reconciliation: How can investors evaluate the efforts of Canadian public companies?

This report introduces a new investor-led effort to put reconciliation on the agenda for Canadian companies. Step one: bring reconciliation and Indigenous relations into the open through better corporate disclosure, which the report finds is often incomplete, inconsistent or lacking altogether.

What we have learned: Principles of Truth and Reconciliation

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada has developed a definition of reconciliation and a guiding set of principles for truth and reconciliation. This definition has informed the Commission’s work and the principles have shaped the calls to action.

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Calls to Action

In order to redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission makes the 94 calls to action for different members of Canadian society.

 

The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

The Circle is a member based network to promote giving, sharing, and philanthropy in Aboriginal communities across the country. They connect with and support the empowerment of First Nations, Inuit and Métis nations, communities, and individuals in building a stronger, healthier future.

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

UNDRIP codifies “Indigenous historical grievances, contemporary challenges and socio-economic, political and cultural aspirations” and is the “culmination of generations-long efforts by Indigenous organizations to get international attention, to secure recognition for their aspirations, and to generate support for their political agendas.”